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Data Atlas

This collection of resources is organized by topic. Within each item, you will find a description of the source project, example maps for the Appalachian region, and links to learn more about the resources or to download data.

Expectations concerning the regional consequences of modern climate change are informed by climate modeling efforts.
The storage of carbon in the form of plant and soil biomass is a crucial component of climate change mitigation.
Economic status and the primary economic activities of a region are closely intertwined with the ways that communities interact with their natural surroundings.
Drought is one of the most ecologically and societally consequential aspects of long-term precipitation and temperature variability.
How people interact with their natural surroundings is linked to economic status in a variety of ways.
Informed expectations about future energy development across the region can identify where these resources may intersect with and impact other ecological or cultural values.
Energy infrastructure build-out is a key component of the regional energy extraction economy, landscape-level environmental impacts, and rural–urban economic and resource linkages.
The storage of carbon in the form of plant and soil biomass is a crucial component of climate change mitigation.
When properly managed, working forests can provide a wide range of important ecosystem services such as clean water and wildlife habitat.
Hydrology in watersheds that are important to the supply of clean water can be negatively impacted by forest pathogen outbreaks.
When the introduction or presence of invasive plant or animal species alters the structure or function of an ecosystem, the services provided by the ecosystem are also affected.
The capacity of ecosystems to provide services such as carbon storage, clean water, and forest products is determined in part by ecosystem dynamics over time.
Forests are crucial in the production of clean drinking water, and nowhere is this more true than in the Appalachians.
Housing density is a good indicator of urbanization, landscape-scale land use intensification, and landscape fragmentation.
Descriptions of landscape cover types and fragmentation yield rich information about how forest, rural, and urban areas interface and mix.
Basic demographic measures can indicate landscape variation in how people use and impact natural resources.
Changes in regional land use and infrastructure planning, and multiple other landscape dynamics, are driven by patterns of population change.
The Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US) inventories the nation's protected open spaces.
Documented ranges of normal climate variability provide a context for understanding present-day and future climate change.
Seasonal homes in the Appalachians are abundant in the more rural areas that provide access to the region’s cultural and natural amenities and scenic views.
Productive soils support a multitude of ecosystem services, agriculture being the premier example.
The boundaries between natural and urban areas in Appalachia are continually challenged as urban populations expand.
Streamflow dynamics, watershed systems, and their relation to terrain are essential for understanding landscape-scale water use and related land use activities.
WaSSI predicts how changes in climate, land cover, and human population may impact water availability and carbon sequestration at the watershed level.
Forested watersheds that are important to the supply of clean water can be negatively impacted by wildland fire.
Wildland fire interacts in complex ways with ecosystem service sustainability throughout the United States.